Facilitating Change

I am taking this blog post from a workshop announcement written by Jay Earley, PhD (personal-growth-programs.com), that does a great job of describing how we can contribute to social transformation.

Our society is in the midst of a major historical transformation, often called the Great Turning. In this time of breakdown and transition, in this time of ferment and hope, you may feel concern, even passion and want to help, but you may not know what you can do. This is because we have too narrow a view of what it means to contribute to social transformation. We tend to think that it has to be done through “political” channels—through canvassing, demonstrating, or writing letters, through working for candidates or activist groups.

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This is a limited model of social change… we need whole-system transformation. It isn’t just certain governmental policies that need to change; it isn’t even just our political and economic system as a whole that needs to change, though it does. All our institutions and social structures must transform–our schools, our businesses, our gender roles, our ways of relating to each other, the way we treat our bodies and emotions, the way we relate to the natural world, and ultimately our view of the nature of reality.

The social structures and ways of being that are changing as part of the ferment of our times are highly interconnected, and everything we do in our lives contributes to and affects the larger direction of society. Everything we do that promotes a new, more appropriate way of being is a contribution to social change—from the way we relate to our kids to the products we buy, from the investments we make to the vacations we take, from the work we do to the way we care for our health, and much, much more.

We can contribute to social transformation by transforming our worldview and changing our lifestyle to one that promotes the new transformed society that is being born. We can contribute by helping to create healthy alternatives on a small scale—democratic organizations, inclusive communities, alternative monetary systems, technologies that are aligned with the earth, and many other possibilities. And of course, we can contribute by working to transform existing institutions.

Jay Earley is author of Transforming Human Culture: Social Evolution and the Planetary Crisis. He was active with Interhelp and Psychotherapists for Social Responsibility, and is now involved with the Pachamama Alliance (like myself).

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About Kaytlyn Dale

#nuffield13 scholar passionate about sacred agriculture and holding space for transforming ourselves so that we can help regenerate the land, soil, Earth and our food system. Pursuing an MA that brings spirituality and agriculture together in the conversation.
This entry was posted in Be the Change, Transformation and Healing, True Transformation for Agriculture and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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